What We Fight About When We Fight About Parking

What We Fight About When We Fight About Parking

Sociologists and criminologists theorize as to why violence can erupt from such seemingly inconsequential concerns. Jeffrey Butts, a professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York, says that the dynamics of parking provocations are sometimes similar to those of gang violence: Individuals who think their territory is threatened feel that they have to respond with violence to protect it.

With Plunging Crime Rate, New York Experts Dreaming Big

With Plunging Crime Rate, New York Experts Dreaming Big

But while the numbers show New York City is shifting gears on criminal justice reform, much harder is to establish, the experts said, is whether new policies are causing the drop in crime or whether they are a consequence of it.... Crime numbers have been decreasing for a long time nationwide, and even worldwide, said Jeffrey Butts, a professor who leads the Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. He has researched the juvenile justice system since the late 1980s.

Nonprofit Quarterly—Community Nonprofits Reduce Gun Violence through Peer Networks

Nonprofit Quarterly—Community Nonprofits Reduce Gun Violence through Peer Networks

The John Jay College of Criminal Justice Research and Evaluation Center analyzed the New York City experience with the Cure Violence model in 2017, seven years after the strategy was adopted. It found reductions in gun injuries of 37–50 percent in the South Bronx and Brooklyn. The center also documented a 14 percent reduction in attitudes supporting violence, with no change in control populations. However, more research is needed.

The Recidivism Trap

The Recidivism Trap

Rather than asking “what’s the recidivism rate?” we should ask an entirely different set of questions about justice interventions. Are we really helping people convicted of crimes to form better relationships with their families and their law-abiding friends? Are we helping them to advance their educational goals? Are they more likely to develop the skills and abilities required for stable employment? Are we helping them to respect others and to participate positively in the civic and cultural life of their communities?

NationSwell—The Impressive Top-to-Bottom Makeover of the Massachusetts Juvenile Justice System

NationSwell—The Impressive Top-to-Bottom Makeover of the Massachusetts Juvenile Justice System

At the height of the War on Drugs, policymakers generally split along partisan lines about how to respond to criminal acts by youth. The right wing saw unchangeable “super-predators” who needed to be incarcerated to restore law and order, while leftists saw victims of poverty who needed counseling and therapy, says Dr. Jeffrey Butts, director of John Jay College of Criminal Justice’s Research & Evaluation Center.

Congressional Quarterly Researcher—Reforming Juvenile Justice

Congressional Quarterly Researcher—Reforming Juvenile Justice

Reforming Juvenile Justice Should teens who murder be treated as adults? by Christina L. Lyons September 11, 2015 ... Americans have “a deep cultural instinct to punish as a way of changing behavior,” says Jeffrey Butts, director of the Research and Evaluation Center at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York. “And [...]

New York Nonprofit Media—Close to Home: A Juvenile Justice Reform Tries to Rebound from Early Troubles

New York Nonprofit Media—Close to Home: A Juvenile Justice Reform Tries to Rebound from Early Troubles

“There’s never a good reason to send kids away,” said Dr. Jeffrey A. Butts, director of the Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. “It could be about convenience, fear, politics or a way of adding jobs to outlying areas where there aren’t enough jobs. But it’s never about public safety.”

The Marshall Project—Gangs of New York

The Marshall Project—Gangs of New York

Jeffrey Butts, a director of research at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, co-wrote an ongoing analysis of Cure Violence’s presence in high-crime New York City neighborhoods and found that homicide rates are on a downward trend in three areas that employed the interrupters in Brooklyn and in northern Manhattan. “They can form relationships in high-violence communities that police, social workers and ministers simply can’t,” Butts said.

Chronicle of Social Change—Positive Youth Justice: Curbing Crime, Building Assets

Chronicle of Social Change—Positive Youth Justice: Curbing Crime, Building Assets

The model is most succinctly explained in a recent brief written by Dr. Jeffrey Butts, a noted juvenile justice researcher at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and a leading proponent of PYJ: “The PYJ Model suggests that youth justice systems should focus on youths’ acquisition of two core developmental assets: learning/doing and attaching/belonging. These two assets should be acquired and experienced by every youth within six distinct domains: work, education, relationships, community, health and creativity.”

JJIE—Evidence-Based ‘Gold Standard’: Coveted, Yet Controversial

JJIE—Evidence-Based ‘Gold Standard’: Coveted, Yet Controversial

Evidence-Based 'Gold Standard': Coveted, Yet Controversial by Gary Gately, August 13, 2014 It seemed a throwback to the days of the country doctor: Go to the patients instead of having them come to you. As a young intern in the pediatrics department at the University of Virginia’s medical school in the mid-1970s, Scott Henggeler got [...]

JJIE—Scared Straight Programs Remain Popular Among Parents

JJIE—Scared Straight Programs Remain Popular Among Parents

At ‘Wit’s End’: Scared Straight Programs Remain Popular Among Parents Despite Warnings by Elly Yu, May 9, 2014 “I have parents saying, ‘I can’t do this anymore, you’ll need to come get her, come get him – I don't want him anymore.’" “I feel like I’m at my wit’s end,” says a mother about her two [...]

JJIE—There is More than One ‘System’ in Juvenile Justice

JJIE—There is More than One ‘System’ in Juvenile Justice

Equating the deepest end of juvenile justice with “the system” distorts the significance of whatever problems affect the youth in secure care. Young people in secure facilities represent a small proportion of the entire youthful offender population.