New York Nonprofit Media—Close to Home: A Juvenile Justice Reform Tries to Rebound from Early Troubles

New York Nonprofit Media—Close to Home: A Juvenile Justice Reform Tries to Rebound from Early Troubles

“There’s never a good reason to send kids away,” said Dr. Jeffrey A. Butts, director of the Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. “It could be about convenience, fear, politics or a way of adding jobs to outlying areas where there aren’t enough jobs. But it’s never about public safety.”

The Marshall Project—Gangs of New York

The Marshall Project—Gangs of New York

Jeffrey Butts, a director of research at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, co-wrote an ongoing analysis of Cure Violence’s presence in high-crime New York City neighborhoods and found that homicide rates are on a downward trend in three areas that employed the interrupters in Brooklyn and in northern Manhattan. “They can form relationships in high-violence communities that police, social workers and ministers simply can’t,” Butts said.

Chronicle of Social Change—Positive Youth Justice: Curbing Crime, Building Assets

Chronicle of Social Change—Positive Youth Justice: Curbing Crime, Building Assets

The model is most succinctly explained in a recent brief written by Dr. Jeffrey Butts, a noted juvenile justice researcher at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice and a leading proponent of PYJ: “The PYJ Model suggests that youth justice systems should focus on youths’ acquisition of two core developmental assets: learning/doing and attaching/belonging. These two assets should be acquired and experienced by every youth within six distinct domains: work, education, relationships, community, health and creativity.”

JJIE—Scared Straight Programs Remain Popular Among Parents

JJIE—Scared Straight Programs Remain Popular Among Parents

Scared straight programs are also fall in line with “tough on crime” mentality in the justice system, said Jeffrey Butts, director of research and evaluation at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and expert on criminal behavior. “It’s a strong thing in America that we believe that being tough on people, punishing people, coercing them – basically forcing them to behave the way we want them to behave – it will somehow work,” he said.

JJIE—There is More than One ‘System’ in Juvenile Justice

JJIE—There is More than One ‘System’ in Juvenile Justice

Equating the deepest end of juvenile justice with “the system” distorts the significance of whatever problems affect the youth in secure care. Young people in secure facilities represent a small proportion of the entire youthful offender population.