Wisconsin Juvenile Prisons Struggle to Change Course

Jeffrey Butts, director of the Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice at the City University of New York, said the Wisconsin prisons’ problems come from poor management. Staff who argue they need things like pepper spray, solitary confinement and shackles are saying “our culture within the facility has become so corrupted by violence we have no other options,” he said.

Why Don’t Local, State and Federal Crime Numbers Add Up?

By Beth Burger The Columbus Dispatch October 17, 2017 Each of last year’s homicide victims had families and friends. Most had funerals and burials. All have Columbus police homicide detectives assigned to their cases, pursuing their killers. So it shouldn’t be difficult to figure out how many people were killed, right? It depends on who … Continue reading Why Don’t Local, State and Federal Crime Numbers Add Up?

Lightning Blasted his Shoes off — and Illuminated a Pattern of Abuse by Staff

BY CAROL MARBIN MILLER AND AUDRA D.S. BURCH OCTOBER 10, 2017 -- Miami Herald For two days, Keyon Felder begged a half-dozen youth care workers to protect him from his tormenter, someone he accused of orchestrating three attacks by other teens — the last of which knocked him out, and injured his face, head, arms, legs, … Continue reading Lightning Blasted his Shoes off — and Illuminated a Pattern of Abuse by Staff

‘Interrupters’ Help Reduce Violence in New York City

Cure Violence in New York City

Community members in Cure Violence program try to defuse disputes before they escalate By Zolan Kanno-Youngs (@KannoYoungs) Wall Street Journal October 2, 2017 They have prior criminal records but now aim to resolve neighborhood conflicts before they turn violent. They walk neighborhood streets on a daily basis and use their connections to resolve disputes before … Continue reading ‘Interrupters’ Help Reduce Violence in New York City

Repairing Trust

As part of an ongoing evaluation of the Cure Violence strategy, researchers found the program was potentially associated with less support for the use of violence and greater confidence in police. In a series of neighborhood surveys, young men in areas with Cure Violence programs were less likely to use violence to settle personal disputes and more likely to rely on law enforcement.

JohnJayREC Awarded $18M in Contracts to Support the New York City Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice

In 2017, the New York City Mayor’s Office of Criminal Justice (MOCJ) engaged the assistance of the Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice (JohnJayREC) to support two initiatives focused on the safety and well-being of New York City neighborhoods.

Multiple Research Methods for Evidence Generation

This chapter describes tools for researchers to address the tasks of problem definition, measurement, causal processes, and generalization. We begin with an extended example of developing practice-based evidence in community-based youth justice organizations in New York City.

Feds Say One of Chicago’s Last ‘Violence Interrupters’ Was Really a Gang Leader

Francisco Sanchez said his days as a gang leader on Chicago’s West Side were over. At 50, he said he had seen numerous lives ruined by violence — young people losing the best years of their lives to prison; children left without parents in the name of petty disputes and turf wars. That’s why he became something else: a leader in an organization committed to ending gun violence.

Jack and Lewis Rudin Research Fellowships

With the support of the May and Samuel Rudin Family Foundation, Inc., the Jack and Lewis Rudin Research Fellowships at John Jay College's Research and Evaluation Center allow graduate student researchers to participate in the Evidence Generation initiative of the Center. The initiative focuses on improving the operations and effectiveness of justice systems in New … Continue reading Jack and Lewis Rudin Research Fellowships

Juveniles Lead Adults in Declining Rate of Drug Crime

Based on statistics compiled by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and disseminated by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) within the U.S. Department of Justice, the national decline in arrests for drug offenses since the 1990s was more prolonged among juveniles than it was among adults age 18 and older.