JJIE—There is More than One ‘System’ in Juvenile Justice

JJIE—There is More than One ‘System’ in Juvenile Justice

Equating the deepest end of juvenile justice with “the system” distorts the significance of whatever problems affect the youth in secure care. Young people in secure facilities represent a small proportion of the entire youthful offender population.

JJIE—Interpreting the Juvenile Incarceration Drop

JJIE—Interpreting the Juvenile Incarceration Drop

Even if we observe a number of instances when state reforms are followed by lower incarceration, we have to test whether the causal hypothesis holds up in the absence of reform? If we lined up all the states according to whether they had enacted meaningful reforms in their juvenile justice systems, would their incarceration trends line up in the same way, with high reform states showing more decline and low reform states showing less? Moreover, does the relationship persist over time and under varying circumstances?

JJIE—Are We Too Quick to Claim Credit for Falling Juvenile Incarceration Rates?

JJIE—Are We Too Quick to Claim Credit for Falling Juvenile Incarceration Rates?

As we celebrate falling incarceration numbers, those of us who work in juvenile justice should take a few moments to contemplate the true origins of the decline. We venture onto thin ice — empirically — if we conclude that incarceration is down because of changes in practice and policy.

Orlando Sentinel—Transfers to Adult Court don’t Explain Drop in Youth Crime

Orlando Sentinel—Transfers to Adult Court don’t Explain Drop in Youth Crime

If Florida transfers far more juveniles to criminal court than any other state and yet the state’s crime decline is about average, then it is simply wrong to credit criminal-court transfer for recent reductions in youth violence.

How Prevalent are Substance Abuse and Mental Health Issues in Juvenile Justice? The Answer May Surprise You

How Prevalent are Substance Abuse and Mental Health Issues in Juvenile Justice? The Answer May Surprise You

When you look at their findings, it is clear that mental health and substance abuse issues are not the main reasons youth come into contact with the justice system, but both problems increase in prevalence as youth are processed more deeply into the system.

The Bond Market and Public Safety

The Bond Market and Public Safety

At least 40 states face swelling budget deficits. Likely targets for reductions include the discretionary social programs that protect public safety. Rather than jeopardize the public's safety and well-being with imprudent cuts, a different and better way out of the financing crunch is explained by two criminologists: the social impact bond.

Teen Courts – Do They Work and Why?

Teen Courts – Do They Work and Why?

Despite their popularity, there are many unanswered questions about the effectiveness of teen courts. The overall impression one gets from the evaluation literature is positive, but researchers have yet to identify exactly why teen courts work. Most important, studies have not yet investigated whether some teen court models are better than others.

Where are Juvenile Crime Trends Headed?

Where are Juvenile Crime Trends Headed?

Jeffrey A. Butts and Howard N. Snyder (2007). Where are Juvenile Crime Trends Headed? Juvenile and Family Justice Today. Spring 2007. After 10 years of stunning decreases in violent crime, fretting over a 3 percent increase is like phoning your doctor in the middle of the night because your child's temperature has reached 99.1 F.

The Oklahoman – Youth System isn’t Broken

The Oklahoman – Youth System isn’t Broken

Sending juveniles to adult prison is not guaranteed to reduce crime. Research shows that an aggressive system of juvenile treatment may prevent more crime than prosecuting youths as adults and giving them lengthy prison sentences.

Baltimore Sun – Too Many Youths Facing Adult Justice

Baltimore Sun – Too Many Youths Facing Adult Justice

It may be convenient to call all youths under age 18 juveniles, but it is legally incorrect and morally evasive. Legally, a person is either a juvenile or an adult. Unless we are fully prepared to think of teens as adults, we should not prosecute them as adults, whether they face capital punishment, imprisonment or probation.