NY1— Shootings Rise in Bronx, Fall in Brooklyn, as Anti-gun Efforts Start

“If all we ever do is call the police in, and we never invest in those other things, we’re just living in a police state,” said Jeffrey Butts, a professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. “We sort of did that in the ’80s and ‘90s, and didn’t get much back from it.” Continue reading NY1— Shootings Rise in Bronx, Fall in Brooklyn, as Anti-gun Efforts Start

New York Magazine — The Risks of Overselling Violence Interruption

The key, we heard over and over again, is to have cops work in tandem with community-based “violence interrupters” — credible messengers from troubled communities who have the savvy and connections to quietly intervene at critical moments and persuade gang members, dope dealers, and other weapon-carriers not to resort to violence. Continue reading New York Magazine — The Risks of Overselling Violence Interruption

Agence France-Presse — À New York, le Maire Eric Adams en Première Ligne Contre la Violence

Mais les mesures de durcissement sur la détention provisoire ou l’inculpation des jeunes, «séduisantes politiquement dans l’immédiat», sont «peu susceptibles d’améliorer la sécurité publique», juge Jeffrey Butts, professeur au John Jay College of Criminal Justice de l’université de New York. Continue reading Agence France-Presse — À New York, le Maire Eric Adams en Première Ligne Contre la Violence

City Lab – As Murders Rise, New York City Turns to a Police Alternative

[Cure Violence workers] “try to stop the cycle of retaliation, and because they are not seen as an extension of law enforcement, the people most likely to be walking around with handguns in their pocket will talk to them and will allow them to settle a dispute before it turns violent,” said Jeffrey Butts, director of the Research and Evaluation Center at City University of New York’s John Jay College of Criminal Justice. Continue reading City Lab – As Murders Rise, New York City Turns to a Police Alternative

Twin Cities Pioneer Press — Treating Violence like a Contagious Disease? Some Think this Might be the Way

As Jeffrey Butts, director of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice research and evaluation center in New York City, noted four years ago, “the public health approach of [Cure Violence] CV currently merits the label ‘promising’ rather than ‘effective.’” “CV, however, offers something to communities that other well-known violence reduction models cannot,” he added. “It is potentially very cost-efficient, and it places less demand on the political and administrative resources of law enforcement and the larger criminal justice system. ” Continue reading Twin Cities Pioneer Press — Treating Violence like a Contagious Disease? Some Think this Might be the Way