Governing Magazine — What We’ve Learned — and Failed to Learn — from a Million COVID Deaths

Many criminologists blame the pandemic and its societal and economic disruptions for the spike in homicides over the past couple of years. “It’s not that the whole society fell apart,” says Jeffrey Butts, director of the Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. “It’s just that there are enough people who were already living on the edge, and this pushed them off of it.”

CNY Central — Onondaga County Considering “Violence Interrupter” Program, First of its Kind in Syracuse

Dr. Jeffrey Butts, the director of research at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, has studied violence interruption programs at the national level. He explained that it's difficult to quantify just how effective these programs are, as violence interrupters in other cities primarily deal with trying to change the community culture through relationships to avoid violence.

Le Monde — La police de New York lancée aux trousses d’un tireur du métro de Brooklyn

Il est cependant rare d’assister dans les rues de la capitale économique et culturelle des EtatsUnis à une attaque impliquant en une fois autant de blessés par balle. « Je ne me souviens pas d’un précédent de ce type », note Jeffrey Butts, professeur au JohnJay College of Criminal Justice de l’université de New York. Pour lui, le Covid19 « n’est pas une cause directe » de la hausse de la criminalité dans la ville, « mais le virus a perturbé toutes les structures sociales – logement, emploi, scolarité – qui maintiennent habituellement les choses sous contrôle »

CSM — CURBING CHICAGO CRIME, ONE JIGSAW CUT AT A TIME

“There’s a whole garden of approaches, with different styles and modalities and theories of change,” says Jeffrey Butts, director of the Research and Evaluation Center at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City. “What’s new, or seems new, is that we’ve reached the point that relying on law enforcement for all of our public safety problems became too obviously problematic.”

Boston Globe — For Some, Report on Mass. Traffic Stops Shows Stubborn Racial Biases Persist in Policing

Jeffrey Butts, the director of the Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College, said Tuesday that the results of the study are “not surprising.” “When we talk about racial and ethnic bias in the justice system it’s always a little increment of bias at every stage . . . [it] ends up being a huge problem at the end,” he said.

La Nacion — Nueva York, ¿Laboratorio para Frenar la Violencia Armada?

“Nueva York es un gran laboratorio para ensayar estrategias porque tenemos una variedad de condados, pero todos en el mismo contexto político y cultural”, dijo a la AFP Jeffrey Butts, profesor e investigador del centro de Justicia Criminal John Jay, que ve necesario “un enfoque diverso”, para atajar la violencia que contemple la “disuasión, coerción y prevención”.

Toledo Blade — Violence Interrupters: How to Measure Success in Toledo and Beyond

“They should not operate in hostility to law enforcement…but they need to operate almost autonomously,” said Jeffrey Butts, director of the Research and Evaluation Center of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York City. “If the neighborhood starts to think that these programs are in cahoots with law enforcement, the young people in the neighborhood will stop talking to the workers.”

NPR — Michigan School Shooter is 1 of Thousands of U.S. Juveniles Charged as Adults in 2021

"If it's just supposed to send a message to that kid and all other people that we take this seriously and we're not going to stand for this behavior, therefore we're punishing you, then it accomplishes that purpose." But Butts says if the idea is to improve public safety or prevent future crime, decades of research show that is rarely the result.

Louisville Courier Journal — Louisville is Spending Millions to Stop Gun Violence Before it Starts. Here’s How it Works.

Jeffrey Butts, director of the Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, is evaluating two crime reduction initiatives at the behest of New York City, which has been investing in a targeted focus on people involved in gun violence. They found the organizations funded through the city’s Office of Criminal Justice "don’t have enough information" because programs "aren’t asked to generate or collect data." "Everyone is running around doing what they think is right,” he said. “Every neighborhood says they know their people, their guys, their culture. But that makes it impossible to say whether the program itself is responsible for improvements in public safety.”

ABC News — Lessons from a ‘Violence Interrupter’ as Shootings Continue to Ravage Chicago

"[Violence interrupters] are from the same streets, grew up in the same areas and had the same experiences as young people and so they just have more access and access means influence," said Jeffrey Butts, director of the Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. "The possibility of influencing someone's behavior and attitude is stronger if you come at them as an equal."