Whose Problem?

Whose Problem?

Rather than simply responding punitively to the criminal behavior of youth, we try to resolve the problems that generate criminal behavior - but whose problems? We Americans are biased in how we identify problems and choose solutions. We like to explain our social problems in a way that conforms to a predetermined set of affordable solutions.

Teen Courts – A Focus on Research

Teen Courts – A Focus on Research

Edited by Thomas Bernard, Serious Delinquency features a survey approach to the major issues in delinquency and the juvenile justice system. Coverage is both broad and deep, yet presented accessibly. Topics include patterns of offending and victimization, predictors, theoretically driven correlates, and a wide range of issues in the operations of the juvenile justice system.

Reviving Juvenile Justice in a Get-Tough Era

Reviving Juvenile Justice in a Get-Tough Era

Edited by Thomas Bernard, Serious Delinquency features a survey approach to the major issues in delinquency and the juvenile justice system. Coverage is both broad and deep, yet presented accessibly. Topics include patterns of offending and victimization, predictors, theoretically driven correlates, and a wide range of issues in the operations of the juvenile justice system.

Juvenile Drug Courts and Teen Substance Abuse

Juvenile Drug Courts and Teen Substance Abuse

We do not know whether juvenile drug courts are more effective than traditional juvenile courts in reducing substance abuse among young offenders. Practitioners, researchers, and policymakers should think carefully about the role drug courts should play in the juvenile justice system.

The Juvenile Court

The Juvenile Court

Jeffrey A. Butts (2002). The Juvenile Court. In The Encyclopedia of Crime and Justice (Second Edition). Joshua Dressler (Editor). New York: Macmillan Reference (Volume 3, pp. 937-947). Introduction Juvenile courts in the United States are legally responsible for young people who are arrested by the police or otherwise accused of breaking the criminal laws of their [...]

Brick by Brick: Dismantling the Border between Juvenile and Adult Justice

Brick by Brick: Dismantling the Border between Juvenile and Adult Justice

Much of the American public and a growing number of policymakers appear to believe that the original concept of juvenile justice was flawed. Public criticism of the juvenile court intensified during the last two decades of the 20th century, and many States began to abandon those aspects of juvenile justice that were once distinctly different from the criminal (adult) justice system.